Archive for July, 2010

A better scenario

Saturday, July 17th, 2010

At this point, a change requires consultation with many channels and promises may need to be rescinded, something no one likes to do the designer may be viewed ad being difficult or uncooperative and the impossible is dumped in his lap

A better scenario would be for the designer to review the artwork and provide embroidery, production and/or artistic recommendations prior to any promises or commitments being Digitizing made. This reduces the frustration of the designer, protects the salesperson, and portrays a more organized and knowledgeable company to the customer.

Although salespeople would rather designers simply “click” up whatever it is they sell, this can not always be accomplishes embroidery designs due to the physical limitations of embroidery. Those who sell embroidery must sell what can be sewn. If they do not possess the technical knowledge required, then they must rely on the designer for this input.

From start to finish

Saturday, July 17th, 2010

The designer must be involved in the embroidery from the start of each project, advising what can and can’t be accomplished with the art. Suggesting alternatives, such as ways to reduce production cost, increase efficiency, improve sew-ability or ways to make the project more artistically creative are part of the designers responsibility embroidery designs.

Much too often, the process follows a course where the designer is bypassed, salespeople give away the farm to demanding clients. The embroidery shop is reluctant to correct the salesperson and/or the customer vector conversion. The digitizing designer is left out until the design is taped to their table and ready to be punched with production deadlines hanging over their head.

A designer

Saturday, July 17th, 2010

A designer is similar to the quarterback on a football team. Your team consists of your talents, equipment, software, and the health of your business. Your opponents(or challenges)  Digitizingare the design, artwork, time limitations and customer’s expectations, your customers are jammed in the stands rooting for you, because is you do well, they do well.

It’s you the designer, who must be on your toes embroidery Digitizing, planning the correct strategy for the project. It’s your responsibility to run the show, direct the team, throw touchdown passes and lead the team to victory. If you do this, the fans,(I mean customers).will jump up and down screaming in celebration, because their team has won “again”. They’re proud of their team and as long ad they continue to win, they’ll never think of breaking it up.

embroidery designs

Friday, July 16th, 2010

A designer is similar to the quarterback on a football team. Your team consists of your talents, equipment, software, and the health of your business. Your opponents(or challenges) are the design, artwork, time limitations and customer’s expectations, your customers are jammed in the stands rooting for you, because is you do well, they do well.

It’s you the designer, who must be on your toes, planning the correct strategy for the project embroidery designs.  It’s your responsibility to run the show, direct the team, throw touchdown passes and lead the team to victory. If you do this, the fans,(I mean customers).will jump up and down screaming in celebration, because their team has won “again”. They’re proud of their team and as long ad they continue to win, they’ll never think of breaking it up.

Ok, I got a little silly vector conversion, but realistically, it’s the designer’s position to be the “embroidery expert” to those they serve, whether it’s an employer or a customer. The designer is the person with the technical expertise in both the embroidery process and the digital process. From concept, to artwork, to thread, and through production, it’s the designer’s responsibility to understand it all.

After determining

Friday, July 16th, 2010

After determining which best describes yourself, take action to bridge the talents of the person you hired, provide direction to aid in the bridging process. If the person is lacking in embroidery experience, have them work on the operational floor with the operators and build their knowledge of production needs first hand digitizing. You might ask a multi head shop if you may observe the production floor or better yet, offer to work for free maybe a day a week to build your experience level.

If you have plenty of technical experience, but are deficient in creative skills, I suggest enrolling in various art programs. Water color, pencil drawing, ceramics or computer design classer vector conversion are readily available through local art stores and community colleges at very affordable prices. Take one or two, but be careful, you might get hooked.

All this might seem too costly, but you can’t afford not to take this advice. To remain one dimensional limits more than just your talents, it limits the embroidery shops who as well. Remember, you can win jobs for people simply by producing a design that looks better embroidery designs. You will retain customers when they know your designs run well and will save them money in production. Winning jobs during the sales calls and reducing your customer’s cost through well running designs will not only bring you business, it will aid in the building of a loyal customer base.

Bridging the gap

Friday, July 16th, 2010

If you see yourself in either of these groups Digitizing, I may have hurt your feeling, and for that I apologize. I certainly do not wish to offend anyone, but hope to aid with your self evaluation so we can map a plan to bridge your talents.

The ideal chemistry is for a designer to have both creative embroidery Digitizing talents and technical skills and the emphasis of each would be applied based on the design’s needs. If your skills are skewed to one aspect, then regardless of what the design requires, you are only able to apply design elements that reflect that single aspect.

technical experience

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

After determining which best describes yourself digitizing, take action to bridge the talents of the person you hired, provide direction to aid in the bridging process. If the person is lacking in embroidery experience, have them work on the operational floor with the operators and build their knowledge of production needs first hand. You might ask a multi head shop if you may observe the production floor or better yet, offer to work for free maybe a day a week to build your experience level.

If you have plenty of technical experience vector conversion, but are deficient in creative skills, I suggest enrolling in various art programs. Water color, pencil drawing, ceramics or computer design classer are readily available through local art stores and community colleges at very affordable prices. Take one or two, but be careful, you might get hooked.

All this might seem too costly embroidery designs, but you can’t afford not to take this advice. To remain one dimensional limits more than just your talents, it limits the embroidery shops who as well. Remember, you can win jobs for people simply by producing a design that looks better. You will retain customers when they know your designs run well and will save them money in production. Winning jobs during the sales calls and reducing your customer’s cost through well running designs will not only bring you business, it will aid in the building of a loyal customer base.

Bridging the gap

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

If you see yourself in either of these groups digitizing, I may have hurt your feeling, and for that I apologize. I certainly do not wish to offend anyone, but hope to aid with your self evaluation so we can map a plan to bridge your talents.

The ideal chemistry is for a designer to have both creative vector conversion talents and technical skills and the emphasis of each would be applied based on the design’s needs. If your skills are skewed to one aspect, then regardless of what the design requires, you are only able to apply design elements that reflect that single aspect.

Graphic artist

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

This is probably the fastest growing group. Thorough understanding of computers and graphic arts makes the transition Digitizing from paper to thread seem easy. Skilled at art form, this group sees artwork as three dimensional. Design aspects others overlook or feel are not possible, become possible to the trained eye.

Graphic artists tend to take more time to complete a design, but their designs have more artistic flare. Their lack of sewing experience is apparent in the design’s run ability. Excessive trims, color embroidery Digitizing changes and generally too much concentration on artistic value and not enough on production needs can eat away profits quickly.

Due to their lack of embroidery training, graphic artists tend embroidery designs to believe if it looks good on screen, it will sew well. A small percentage of this group believe this premise to such an extent, they won’t invest in a machine to verify their work.

Machine operators

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

After watching countless designs run, machine operators know a good digitizing design from a poor one. They’ve seen it all, from needle breaks and fraying thread, to poor pathing and letters too small for embroidery. Machine operators understand the mechanics of the machine and what can and can’t be done in thread.They possess a solid understanding of push and pull, backings, toppings, and hoping. The effects of different fabric types in nothing new for them and they’re masters at trimming. Production oriented, machine operators who become vector conversion designers always look for ways to improve the system and it shows in their designs.Machine operators, turned designer, produce a lot of designs a day. Their experience makes pathing a snap. Sounds too good to be true, doesn’t it? The downside is the designs typically lack flare and pop. Flat in appearance, this group sees artwork as one dimensional. More designs a day at the expense of artistic design means this group is best suited for easy to moderately complex designs, and count on the designs running well.